Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes a constant threat

1991
Y Ishizuki and others. The Effects on the Thyroid Gland of Soybeans Administered Experimentally in Healthy Subjects. Nippon Naibunpi Gakkai Zasshi 1991, 767: 622-629. Feeding 30 grams (2 tablespoons) roasted pickled soybeans per day for three months to healthy adults receiving adequate iodine intake caused thyroid suppression, especially in the elderly. Hypometabolic symptoms (malaise, constipation, sleepiness) and goiters appeared in half the younger subjects (mean age of 29) and half the older subjects (mean age 61). The symptoms disappeared 1 month after the cessation of soybean ingestion. “These findings suggested that excessive soybean ingestion for a certain duration might suppress thyroid function and cause goiters in healthy people, especially elderly subjects.” Note that 30 grams per day was considered “excessive” by these Japanese researchers.

Adverse Effects of Engineered Nanoparticles: A Disease-Oriented Approach provides a systematic evaluation of representative engineered nanomaterial (ENM) of high volume production and of high economic importance. Each class of nanomaterials discussed includes information on what scientists, industry, regulatory agencies and the general public need to know about nanosafety.  This book, written by leading international experts in nanotoxicology and nanmoedicine, gives a comprehensive view of the health impact of ENM, focusing on their potential adverse effects in exposed workers, consumers and patients.  The beneficial applications, both diagnostic and therapeutic, of ENM are also highlighted.  This book fills an important need in terms of bridging the gap between experimental findings and human exposure to ENM, and the clinical and pathological consequences of such exposure in the human population.

Effective options for stress ulcer prophylaxis include PPIs, H 2 antagonists, antacids, and sucralfate (Carafate). No medication has been shown to be superior to another. Although the optimal duration of prophylaxis is not known, most experts suggest continuing therapy while the patient is in the ICU, when bleeding risk is highest. However, many patients continue to receive prophylaxis inappropriately when they are transferred to general medical units and continue therapy after discharge without clear medical indications. 31 To minimize adverse outcomes, physicians should discontinue PPIs in patients when they are discharged from the ICU if there are no other indications for therapy.

A study by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) found that in 2011, sedatives and hypnotics were a leading source for adverse drug events seen in the hospital setting. Approximately % of all ADEs present on admission and % of ADEs that originated during a hospital stay were caused by a sedative or hypnotic drug. [20] A second study by AHRQ found that in 2011, the most common specifically identified causes of adverse drug events that originated during hospital stays in the . were steroids, antibiotics, opiates/narcotics, and anticoagulants. Patients treated in urban teaching hospitals had higher rates of ADEs involving antibiotics and opiates/narcotics compared to those treated in urban nonteaching hospitals. Those treated in private, nonprofit hospitals had higher rates of most ADE causes compared to patients treated in public or private, for-profit hospitals. [21]

Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes a constant threat

adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes a constant threat

A study by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) found that in 2011, sedatives and hypnotics were a leading source for adverse drug events seen in the hospital setting. Approximately % of all ADEs present on admission and % of ADEs that originated during a hospital stay were caused by a sedative or hypnotic drug. [20] A second study by AHRQ found that in 2011, the most common specifically identified causes of adverse drug events that originated during hospital stays in the . were steroids, antibiotics, opiates/narcotics, and anticoagulants. Patients treated in urban teaching hospitals had higher rates of ADEs involving antibiotics and opiates/narcotics compared to those treated in urban nonteaching hospitals. Those treated in private, nonprofit hospitals had higher rates of most ADE causes compared to patients treated in public or private, for-profit hospitals. [21]

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