Antileukotriene agents compared to inhaled corticosteroids

Michael A Kaliner, MD  Clinical Professor of Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine; Medical Director, Institute for Asthma and Allergy

Michael A Kaliner, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology , American Association of Immunologists , American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology , American Society for Clinical Investigation , American Thoracic Society , Association of American Physicians

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Safety and efficacy in infants <6 months of age with perennial allergic rhinitis not established. 1 Safety and efficacy in infants <2 years of age with seasonal allergic rhinitis not established. 1 Efficacy in children 2–14 years of age or 6 months to 14 years of age with seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitis, respectively, extrapolated from demonstrated efficacy in adolescents ≥15 years of age and the similarity of the disease course, pathophysiology, and effects of the drug among these populations. 1 Safety in pediatric patients 2–14 years of age with allergic rhinitis supported by data from studies in children from this age group with asthma. 1 Safety in infants 6–23 months of age with perennial allergic rhinitis supported by data from studies in infants with asthma and by pharmacokinetic data comparing systemic exposure in such pediatric patients with that in adults. 1

Antileukotriene agents compared to inhaled corticosteroids

antileukotriene agents compared to inhaled corticosteroids

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